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I enjoy watching programs on the nature channels about various creatures and plant life. I am amazed by the variety and God’s creativity. Yes, I believe there’s a Creator and we are not accidents of nature, but that’s for another discussion.

Sometimes when watching I think, “I’m glad humans don’t do that.” Such as when a cow is licking her calf clean right after birth. In the last couple years I’ve seen two births that brought up the same statement. They’re not gross and are even kind of funny. And men, one of these is for you!

First, is the Suriname Sea Toad. The young toads develop under the skin on the back of the mother. I wonder what she’s feeling as the toads are developing and moving around under her skin. When they are ready to move on, they jump out of holes on the mother’s back, leaving her with craters. Don’t believe me? Click on photo for a brief NatGeo video:

Surname Sea Toad with Eggs in Back

Surname Sea Toad with Eggs in Back

The second is one I saw recently on a program with David Attenborough. I was familiar with Mr. Attenborough through the LIFE series he did with BBC Earth. This program was on the 10 animals he would have on his ark to save from extinction. It’s another amphibian called Darwin’s Frog. With this frog, the female lays 3 to 8 eggs and when they hatch into tadpoles, then it gets weird. Tadpoles have a lot of predators, but for these little guys, the male toad scoops them up and keeps them in his vocal sack until they’ve transformed into little frogs. I guess it gives new meaning to “you have a frog in your throat.” When the frogs are ready to move on, dad spits them out of his mouth. Click on photo for a brief NatGeo video:

Darwin's Frog

Darwin’s Frog

Although I don’t always agree with the explanations on why the creatures are the way they are, I am thankful for the many people who study and film the animals and plants and the technology (often tiny hidden cameras) that enables me to see things I would otherwise miss. I will continue to be fascinated!

 

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